Grab the ultimate summer six pack and treat yourself to some pamper time with one of our top picks.

Book Corner - Jojo MoyesStill Me
by JoJo Moyes
Penguin Random House, $38

I heart Louisa Clarke. And I heart Still Me. Unlike movie sequels, there’s nothing to fear here, in JoJo Moyes third book in the Me Before You series. The quirky endearing character of Louisa Clarke draws in the reader and you can’t help but follow along until the end. Embarking on a fresh life in New York, she finally begins to discover who she is and what’s important to her. Mixing with high society and struggling to juggle two separate lives, Louisa’s journey is another JoJo Moyes’ addictive read.



Differently Normal

Book Corner - Tammy Robinsonby Tammy Robinson
Hachette, $29.99

New Zealand author Tammy Robinson dishes up a mesmerising read about first love, family love, expectations and sacrifice. Maddy’s work and personal life revolves around helping keep her autistic sister healthy and happy. So she has no time for complications – or boyfriends. And when she meets Albert, juggling his own challenges, the pair embarks on a fresh journey. Written with exquisite tenderness, humour and heartbreak, I defy you not to shed a tear.



The Cactus

Book Corner - The Cactusby Sarah Haywood
Hachette, $34.99

It’s riveting to have many layers of a personality unfold page by page. The prickly main character of Susan Green (don’t call her Suze) slowly and enticingly unfolds in The Cactus, with fresh facets of her personality slowly revealed. She’s not always warm or loveable, but she is eminently relatable – which somehow makes her burrow under your skin and want to know more. Susan thinks she has the perfect life, but when her mother dies and her relationship with her estranged brother is under the spotlight, the cracks begin to show.



The Monk of Mocha

Book Corner - The Monk of Mokhaby Dave Eggers
Penguin Random House, $38

A memorable coffee is a unique blend of many flavours and layers, and so it is with The Monk of Mocha.This fascinating true story brings together subjects as diverse as coffee, politics, war, religion, culture and business – but somehow manages to align these strands into a smoothly flavoursome read. It also offers up an insight into Yemen and the radiating impact of civil war and politics – but without being too cumbersome a read. Rather it is thoughtful and insightful, and immensely palatable.